MSH – Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormones

What is Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH)?

MSH: Also known as: a-MSH,  a-melanocyte stimulating hormone, alpha-melanotropin and alpha-melanocortin

Melanocyte-stimulating hormone is a group of peptide hormones produced by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus and in the skin cells. msh

The Role of MSH

  • Tanning and Pigmentation – Skin, hair and eyes
    Specialised skin cells called melanocytes produce a pigment referred to as melanin.
  • Protecting Skin from UV damage.
    Melanin protects cells from DNA Damage or Melanoma
  • Appetite and Fat Storage
    Aids in the control of the appetite.
    Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH) suppresses appetite by acting on receptors in the hypothalamus in the brain. This effect is enhanced by leptin hormone.
  • Anti- inflammatory
    Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH) influences the release of hormone aldosterone which controls salt and water balance in the body

Tanning Injections – Increasing your ability to produce melanin.

What role do tanning peptides play in the production of melanin?

First synthesised at the University of Arizona, scientists discovered the use of a “tanning peptide” when investigating possible ways to treat skin cancer. The hypothesis was that by inducing the body’s natural pigmentary system through the process of melanogenesis, a protective tan could be produced before UV exposure, thereby reducing the potential for skin damage.

With just a little UV exposure, the release of a-MSH stimulates a natural increase in the production of melanin from the melanocytes in the skin. Use of the tanning peptide provides more a-MSH which results in more melanin being produced and greater tanning potential (skin pigmentation) regardless of your skin type.

Clinical trials have shown that use of the tanning peptide may hold the potential to promote melanogenesis, with minimal side effects.

The primary role of melanogenesis is to protect the hypodermis, which is the layer under the skin from the UV-B light that causes damage. How it works is that it absorbs all of the UV-B light, blocking its passage into the skin layer.

The Suns Ultraviolet Rays

Ultraviolet A

  • long-wave rays
  • least destructive
  • creates short lived superficial tan
  • doesn’t cause melanocytes to release more melanin
  • darkens existing melanin only
  • UVA does single strand breakage

Ultraviolet B

  • shortwave rays
  • Type B rays
  • More DNA damage
  • melanocytes release more melanin to protect the body
  • body darkens faster when exposed to UVA beams
  • UVB does double strand breakage and causes non-functional bonds

UVC

  • blocked by the ozone
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